In The Kitchen
What's for breakfast What's for lunch What's for brunch What's for brunch Word on the street

Some nice stuff's been said about the restaurant. Here's a sample:


“Marigold Kitchen owners Phillip Hurley and John Gadau cut their teeth at West Coast institutions like Zuni Café, Patina, and Citrus, then brought their skills inland to downtown Madison. In an industrial space softened by natural woods and fabrics, they offer inventive takes on familiar foods, like chervil and Gruyere omelets, chicken breast with roasted red pepper relish, and Boursin on ciabatta.” Bon Appetit Magazine


“The new Marigold Kitchen, one block off the square on South Pinckney Street, has become a morning favorite for specialties such as chili-poached organic eggs.” Midwest Living


“But my favorite breakfast spot? Marigold Kitchen. I love this place; sometimes I find myself imagining the golden life we'd all live if chefs and co-owners John Gadau and Phillip Hurley could be persuaded to duplicate their restaurant in Minneapolis...Their hip, friendly operation works on several levels. The setting is colorful and cool - like dining in a Paul Smith store and the affordable prices encourage frequent visits. But it's the food that really gives the Marigold its edge: clever twists on what could be been-there, done-that fare, skillfully executed using top-notch ingredients.

There's lots to like at lunch - sandwiches (get the tangy pulled pork, or the tuna Nicoise on toasted sourdough), salads and a few entrees (halibut with sweet-pea risotto, salmon with green beans drizzled in a champagne vinaigrette) that would cost twice the price anywhere else and be half as good.

But my loyalties really lie with breakfast, where plain-old poached eggs and toast become a pair of organic locally grown eggs dressed with chiles, prosciutto and manchengo cheese and paired with crisply toasted rosemary bread. Pancakes are paper-thin, glazed with an orange-almond butter and crowned with farm-fresh blueberries. Fruit and yogurt is reimagined as a giant bowl of berries, melon and toasted walnuts drizzled with an aromatic lavender-infused honey.

...My final tip: Grab a few chocolate-dipped coconut macaroons for the road.” Minneapolis Star Tribune


“...Captivated by the poetry in the flash of knives and skilled hands, I'm thrilled by the fast flow of beautiful, tantalizing food. Co-owners and chefs Phillip Hurley and John Gadau are an engaging and joyous team able to talk about their philosophies, garnish soup and construct amazing sandwich plates with barely a pause.”

“ Everything is homemade at Marigold, down to the mayonnaise and stocks for soups. These chefs are committed to using local products as often as possible, and were excited to tell me that Hurley's friends at West Star Farm are growing vegetables specifically for the restaurant this year.”

“Every item that whips past me is generous, beautifully arranged and often presented with an interesting twist.” Isthmus Dining


“Also fast becoming legendary is runner-up Marigold Kitchen, a patch of soul on Pinckney Street, home to sumptuous breakfasts and lunches.” Isthmus Annual Manual


“...Marigold has earned a reputation for dishing up the right stuff, for cooking food from scratch with seasonal ingredients and for an eclectic, unpretentious atmosphere.”

“For breakfast, there are “classics” like blueberry pancakes or French toast mad with challah bread served with a delicate pastry cream, real maple syrup and mixed-berry puree...Omelets come with a variety of satisfying stuffing combinations like ham or chorizo sausage, Gruyere or aged cheddar, sweet corn relish, zucchini or artichoke...Chile poached eggs, just the right side of runny, are served with pieces of prosciutto, manchego...and red pepper flakes. An expert duck confit or hash made of tender strips of not-too fatty duck shares the bill alongside poached eggs and mixed salad greens.”

“The hard part is deciding what to choose.” Madison Magazine